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Wet Scrubber - Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD)

B&W’s proven technology, flexibility of design options and advanced features of our wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems help to reduce emissions in new or retrofit applications.

Our wet FGD systems, or wet scrubbers, have operated efficiently, economically and reliably since 1971.

Current designs can achieve more than 99% SO2 removal, with system availability greater than 99.5%. Our absorber design also provides reduced operating and maintenance costs.

As a multi-pollutant control device, B&W’s wet scrubbers also help control filterable (solid) particulate, acid mist and mercury.

Features and benefits include:

  • Forced or inhibited oxidation – provide options for selling gypsum byproduct or eliminating wastewater discharge
  • Single or dual tray designs – promotes gas/liquid contact and uniform gas distribution for improved emissions reduction
  • Large, single absorber capability to treat multiple boilers – smaller plant footprint and reduced operating costs
  • Choice of reagents – provides flexibility
  • Interspatial spray headers – more effective overlapping spray coverage for shorter absorber towers, reduced pump power, lower building height, less external recirculation piping, and easier nozzle inspection and maintenance
  • Moisture separators – rugged and effective design helps prevent slurry carryover

In addition to flue gas absorbers, we supply complete systems, including reagent preparation, dewatering and related system equipment. Our wet FGD experts provide design and engineering as well as start-up, commissioning and support services.

Applicable boiler sizes:

  • 50 MW to 1300 MW

Removal efficiencies:

  • Up to 99%

Reagents:

  • Primarily limestone; also lime, magnesium-enhanced lime, sodium carbonate, and ammonia.

Fuels:

  • All solid fuels — primarily coal.
Upgrades, Parts & Service

Wet Scrubbers FGD Success Stories

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Amos Power Plant, West Virginia
American Electric Power (AEP) Case Study
The John E. Amos Power Plant in Winfield, West Virginia, is owned and operated by Appalachian Power, a subsidiary of American Electric Power (AEP). The nearly 3,000 MW of energy it generates is enough to power approximately two million homes.
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Stratton, Ohio
W.H. Sammis Plant Case Study
The W.H. Sammis plant is the largest of FirstEnergy’s coal-fired electric generating facilities in Ohio. The plant consists of seven coal-fired units totaling 2,220 MW and is located along the Ohio River.
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Monroe, Michigan
Monroe Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 Case Study
The wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system from B&W features a combination of design components to provide a high level of reliability and removal efficiencies. These include B&W’s signature tray tower design that provides excellent gas-to-liquid contact and uniform flow distribution.
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Maidsville, West Virginia
Fort Martin Case Study
The wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system from Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) features a combination of design components to provide a high level of reliability and removal efficiencies. These include B&W's signature dual tray tower design that provides excellent gas-to-liquid contact and uniform flow distribution through the absorber spray zones; its patented inlet awning; interspatial headers to reduce absorber height, pump power requirements, and internal support costs; forced oxidation system; a
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Masontown, Pennsylvania
Hatfield’s Ferry Station Case Study
The wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system from Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) features a combination of design components to provide a high level of reliability and removal efficiencies. These include B&W's signature dual tray tower design that provides excellent gas-to-liquid contact and uniform flow distribution through the absorber spray zones; its patented inlet awning; interspatial headers to reduce absorber height, pump power requirements, and internal support costs; forced oxidation system; a
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