Ignitor Systems

FPS Ignitor Systems

B&W provides new and replacement FPS® gas, oil and dual fuel ignitors (also spelled as 'igniter'), ignitor auxiliary equipment, replacement parts, optical and fiber optic flame scanners and ignition control systems for both wall-fired and corner-fired boiler applications.  Since 1988, B&W and FPS have brought together their burner and ignitor technologies to offer world class combustion systems.

Wall-fired ignitors

Reliable ignition is more important than ever with the increasing use of on/off cycling and low load operation. As the exclusive supplier of the FPS® line of ignition equipment in the U.S., B&W has successfully used these proven ignitors in a variety of burner and fuel applications. This includes new low NOx burners as well as replacement of old ignitors in existing burners, and replacement parts.

Available for both gas and oil, this advanced ignitor design was developed to achieve superior flame ignition and flame stability with low opacity. The FPS gas ignitor serves as a dual-purpose ignitor for boiler warm-up, burner light-off and support during unstable pulverizer conditions.

The ignitor features a proven flame rod technology for detecting the ignitor flame while discriminating from other flames in the boiler. The FPS ignitor is designed as a simple plug-in replacement of your existing ignitor with little or no modification necessary to the rest of the burner.

FPS ignitors offer:

  • Proven performance
  • Low opacity
  • Reliable ignition
  • Superior flame stability
  • Integral flame detection
  • Discrete flame detection
  • Fixed position; no moving parts
  • Low cost plug-in design
  • Lower maintenance
  • Proven mechanical reliability and operation
  • Fuel savings during startup
 

FPS gas ignitor

The FPS ignitor is designed as a simple plug-in replacement of your existing ignitor with little or no modification necessary to the rest of the burner. 

FPS oil ignitor

The FPS oil ignitor serves as a dual purpose ignitor for boiler warm-up, burner light-off and support during unstable pulverizer conditions. 

Valve rack

A standard valve rack with control panel is factory wired and tested to reduce installation time and cost. The valve rack can be conveniently located anywhere near the burner front.    

Corner-fired ignitors

For corner-fired boilers originally developed by Combustion Engineering (CE)/Alstom, B&W offers FPS gas and oil horn ignitors. These horn ignitors integrate electrical and mechanical components to optimize performance of ignition reliability, combustion, flame stability, and flame monitoring.

Features of the FPS horn ignitor:
Easy installation and maintenance – Our horn ignitors are shop assembled onto the mounting plate so that the internal components insert through the windbox air chamber and into the ignitor horn. The ignitor assembly can be easily withdrawn for maintenance.

Plasma arc ignition system – To prevent the common problem of spark plug fouling on horn ignitors, and to provide reliable light-off over the long term, FPS horn ignitors are equipped with the plasma arc ignition (PAI) system which provides pulsed high energy sparks during the ignition trial time.

SunSpot flame detector – Both the gas and oil horn ignitors are equipped with the integral Sun Spot flame detection system, a proven flame rod technology for detecting the ignitor flame while discriminating from other flames in the boiler.

  • Discrete flame detection
  • No periodic maintenance requirement
  • No field calibration
  • No delicate optics to break or get dirty
     

Benefits of the FPS horn ignitor:

  • Easy installation and maintenance
  • Reliable ignition
  • Flame stability
  • Reliable flame detection and monitoring
  • Single pour stainless steel horn casting

FPS gas horn ignitor 

FPS oil horn ignitor

Ignitor Troubleshooting Guide

No Flame Present

1. Is there a flame indication?

Visually verify if the flame is present.

If a flame is present, but no flame indication is shown, see the next section titled "Flame Present But No Indication".

If no flame is present, continue with the next step.

2. Is ignitor sequence correct?

Check the ignitor sequence.

  • Are automated valves operating correctly?
  • Is Instrument air open at 60 psig minimum?
  • If equipped, are the automated isolation valves opening?

3. Are hoses properly seated and valves open?

Is the quick disconnect on the oil and air hose secured to the atomizer?

Are ALL manual valves open?

4. Strainer and filters

Check and clean the strainer and filters.

5. Are the oil and air pressure settings correct?

Start the ignitor group and check the oil and air pressure settings.

6. Is there a spark?

If no spark, remove and test sparker.

Check the ignition system:

  • Transformer
  • Electrical connections/wiring
  • Wire terminator
  • High temperature extension
  • Spark plug insulator/gap (Gap 0.180" to 0.250'), if equipped
  • Plasma ignition plug wear - replace if necessary 

7. Is the ignitor combustion air setting correct?

  • Check the combustion air pressure at the 1/8" tap between the ignitor and gate valve.

  • Close gate valve and check pressure at end of ignitor.

  • In most cases, ignitor air setting should be 2" to 4" wc above the pressure at the end of the igniter.

  • Pressure-fired units - the combustion/cooling air ignitor valve is utilized to balance system pressure for ignitors. The blower outlet damper is used to control ignitor pressure (approximately 2" to 6" wc above furnace pressure) relative to furnace pressure.

8. Is the atomizer plugged?

Remove the atomizer and disassemble.

Check and clean the nozzle ports and fogging holes.

Check inner oil tube for plugging - clean if necessary.

9. Are the quick disconnects plugged?

In the previous step, if the atomizer and oil tube showed a considerable amount of debris, it is possible that the quick disconnects will need to be checked and cleaned.

Flame Present But No Indication

1. Is there a flame indication?

Visually verify if the flame is present.

If no flame is present, see the previous section titled "No Flame Present".

If a flame is present, but no flame indication is shown, continue with the next step.

2. Is ignitor SunSpot module OK?

Check ignitor SunSpot module front plate.

If module is OK, go to next step.

With ignitor off, the only light indication should be the power light.

  • No power indication - check fuse and power source
  • Ionization indication - indicates bad module or short:
  1. Switch modules with a good module to see if light indication moves with module. If indication moves with module - replace module.
  2. If light indication does not move, this indicates a short. In the following manner, determine the location of short or faulty component (constantly checking module indication):
  • Remove flame rod assembly from ignitor. Check and clean tip.
  • R1move flame rod tip - replace.
  • Remove high temperature extension - replace.
  • Check wire terminator connection - replace.
  • Check flex conduit wiring/connection - replace.

3. Module shows OK.

Check the flame rod system. Remove the flame rod and rob the flame rod tip on the metal grating. The ionization and flame light indication should come on locally and in the burner management system (BMS). If not, see previous step and check wiring to BMS.

4. Are the oil and air pressure settings correct?

Start the ignitor group and check the oil and air pressure settings.

5. Is the igniter combustion air setting correct?

  • Check the combustion air pressure at the 1/8" tap between the ignitor and gate valve.

  • Close gate valve and check pressure at end of ignitor.

  • In most cases, ignitor air setting should be 2" to 4" wc above the pressure at the end of the igniter.

  • Pressure-fired units - the combustion/cooling air ignitor valve is utilized to balance system pressure for ignitors. The blower outlet damper is used to control ignitor pressure (approximately 2" to 6" wc above furnace pressure) relative to furnace pressure.

6. Is the flame rod voltage correct?

Check the SunSpot voltage readings on terminals 9 and 10 on the module's base.

Normal readings are 2-5 VAC and 90 VDC or below.

Slowly decrease or increase ignitor combustion air to get indications. Voltages will change.

Retest the ignitor group start-up to ensure light-off and indication.